Sunday, November 25, 2012

WHAT IS IT? CONTEST!

It has been several weeks since the last "What Is It?" question.  I hope to get back into the groove of having the weekly question available on Sunday evenings for all current crew to answer.  Please do not hesitate to play as we are now down to the last several questions.  With the anticipated return date of 15 December to TSM of ELISSA, we have only 2 more opportunities to try and answer the weekly question and be eligible to have your name drawn to win the grand prize.

***Scroll down for the answer to the last What is it ? question***

And now for this week's photo of an item found aboard ELISSA.

What is the correct name of the item the lowest red arrow is pointing at?


 
Good luck and please give the contest a try!  This is the prize the lucky winner will receive:

A BEAUTIFUL FRAMED 36"x24" GICLEE OF ELISSA AS FJELD

 
 
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Previous Week's Photo and Answer
 
 
 

 
 
There were many correct answers given on this one!!!  Let's hope we have similar results this week
 
Congratulations to everyone who gave the correct answer.
 
 
 
 
 


Sunday, October 28, 2012

What is it? Contest!



*** Scroll down for last week's photo and answer with the names of the winners***

Sunday November 4, 2012


And now for this week's photo of a item found aboard ELISSA.


What is the name of the round bar with service on it and marked with a red arrow? 







 Good luck and please give the contest a try!. This is the prize the lucky winner will receive. 





Grand Prize:

A beautiful framed 36" x 24" giclée of ELISSA as Fjeld



Last week's photo and answer:


Sunday October 28, 2012



 

 

 


Quite a few of you gave the correct answer of main starboard lower topsail brace!!!!

 

Congratulations to everyone who won.











Sunday, October 21, 2012

 

What is it? Contest!


 *** Scroll down for last week's photo and answer with the names of the winners***


Sunday October 21, 2012

Since the last 2 weeks have apparently been very difficult and with ELISSA's birthday coming up, I have found an easy one...I hope!



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Good luck and please give the contest a go.  This is the prize the lucky winner will receive.
 

 

 Grand Prize:

A beautiful framed 36" x 24" giclée of ELISSA as Fjeld

 

Last week's photo and answer:

Sunday October 14, 2012


 


The correct answer is deck cringle.  Identifying the fitting as a  deck thimble is acceptable, but not as correct.

Congratulations to Root Choyse and Rick Bounds for submitting the correct answer.  Root is amassing a very formidable score - she is 100% in her responses.

 
 The name of this fitting is found on pages 107 & 132 in Masting and Rigging the Clipper Ship and Ocean Carrier by Harold Underhill...and we just last week received a copy for TSM's Maritime library. Please avail yourselves of the wonderful library at TSM.

 

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Sunday October 14, 2012


*** Scroll down for this week's photo***

Last week's photo and answer:









This "item" is one of many that are located along the sheer strake at the fore and main mast. This fitting is one of the ELISSA's chainplates. It is more accurately known as a chainplate palm and is the lower end of the chainplate that is riveted to the sheerstrake/ bulwark interface.

The winners of last week's contest are:
  • Root Choyce
  • Ed Green
  • Janine da Silva
  • Rick Bounds
  • Erich Wagner
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Sunday October 14, 2012

What Is It? Contest!




Thought I would make it a little more challenging this week. I have so often heard this fitting referred to a variety of names and seldom the correct one. You do not need to identify which one this is, only what is its name. Part of the idea behind this contest is to educate all of us on the proper terms for the bits of gear we all see or use every time we step aboard ELISSA ~ a kind of vocabulary quiz from the lexicon of a square-rig sailor. I hope more people give the contest a try and remember to look at 19th century British sources for the answers.
I would suggest looking at one of my favorite rigging sources for 19th century British sailing ships - Masting and Rigging the Clipper Ship and Ocean Carrier by Harold Underhill...and we just last week received a copy for TSM's Maritime library. Please avail yourselves of the wonderful library at TSM.

Fair Leads,

Jamie

Sunday, October 7, 2012


Sunday October 7, 2012





Congratulations to last week's winners of the The What Is It Contest????

  • Rebecca Johnson
  • Root Choyce 
  • Dennis Dornfest
  • Janine da Silva 
  • Rick Bounds

 Be sure to view this week's photo and see the answer to last week's contest by clicking on the following link:  What Is It Contest???

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Sunday, September 30, 2012

Sunday September 30, 2012



Click here for the current week's photo: 

The What Is It? Contest



The photo from last week's contest:




...and the larger photo before cropping:




The answer is the lower rudder pintle or pintle bracket.


Congratulations to our winners!

Last week's contest was the inaugural week to this contest and the winners are:
  1. Ed Green
  2. Rebecca Johnson
  3. Root Choyce
  4. Seth Leo
I hope this week's contest is a little easier and will generate more winners!

Here is this week's photo - Please identify what bit of gear the red arrow is pointing at.




Best of luck and remember to email your entries to John Schaumburg or Bosun Mark before 5:00 pm next Saturday October 6, 2012

Remember the more weeks you answer correctly the better your chances are for the beautiful framed giclee of ELISSA as Fjeld.













Saturday, September 29, 2012



Please forgive some formatting problems this blog is having  -  I am working on correcting them.

ELISSA Redivivus ~ 2012 Restoration



This week in the shipyard:


Monday September 24, 2012


This week at the shipyard began with cropping out an additional 4" of the garboard strake at frames 69 to 73 on the starboard side of the ship.  The frames are numbered from aft to forward with frame number 1 being at the stern post.  I was very happy to see over 3/8" late thickness at the cut.  The original scantlings for the shell plate at the garboard near the bow is 7/16" - so we have suffered very little wastage at this plate.  Unfortunately the electrolytic corrosion does not care if the plate is thick or thin and will attack both with equal vigor.


The cropped garboard plate

 note the butt joint and butt backing plate and the concrete... more about the concrete later.



 This frame angle flange is a little too thin for welding the new shell plate  and will need to be renewed.


While over on the port side, just aft of the bow, a worker is scaling the exposed frames in preparation for tacking up a new plate.


...and the never ending battle of removing the concrete from the bilges. 


More cropping out of shell plate in search of thicker plate at the stern on port and

 on the starboard side.
video








A good welder can wash off a section of shell plate with a cutting torch and barely kiss the iron frame underneath.



video




In the late morning a reporter from the local Houston Fox News affiliate, Channel 26, dropped by to shoot some footage for a story on the work being performed on the official tall ship of Texas ELISSA.
Here is a link to the footage: 


Bosun Mark found a section of piping that had a pin hole leak. 

 It is so very vital to keep coatings on everything in the bilge...including the underside of a reverse bend.  All the effort we put into maintenance is paid back in full measures.  Always keep in mind that the "underside" of a bit of gear is still a "side" to be coated -  whether piping or the main pin rail and fife rails.



At the close of another day.





 

Tuesday September 25, 2012


Tuesday morning was beautiful with a glorious sunrise and the ever present staccato of the chipping hammer picking away at the concrete in the bow and stern.






Almost looks as if our ELISSA is missing a tooth.



Later in the morning, the Coast Guard inspector showed up to take a look at what was revealed by the additional cropping of plate and if the resulting edges were at the required thickness for welding in an insert plate.


The framing at frames 63- 66 appeared sound, but the plate was still too thin at about 1/4"




A beautiful original frame from 1877 Aberdeen, Scotland and the yard of Alexander Hall & Co.


At the lower edge of the cut out on the after port bow, the concrete was chipped away and exposed this butt plate and wash plate with limber hole.



It is always difficult to gage what amount of cropping back will result in thick enough plate.  When the plating in question is steel plate from the Greek restoration or Galveston first restoration, it is not a difficult decision.  When it is the original historic wrought iron plate, the decision is more difficult, but in the end - it is whatever is best for the safe operation of the ship and her company


video




The Coast Guard was not satisfied and directed that additional plate needed to be cropped back in several locations already openned up. 

video




Here the crew is marking the radius for the upper edge of the enlarged cut out.

 
While aft at the stern and under the thrust bearing of the tail shaft... more concrete and cropping is needed.